Alfred Munnings: War Artist 1918

One of Britain’s most celebrated equine artists, Alfred Munnings will have a collection of 40 original paintings from his time with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during WW1 on display at the National Army Museum. On show from 30 November – 3 March 2019, this will be the first time the paintings have been displayed together in England in more than 100 years.

Munnings was the official war artist commissioned by the Canadian War Memorials Fund. His impressionist paintings cover equine subjects, portraiture and pastoral landscapes providing an insight into the men of the Canadian Cavalry Brigade and Canadian Forestry Corps. Famed for his equine pantings, these pieces highlight the role of horses in military operations; capturing their beauty in the war affected landscapes of France 1918.

Tickets are £6 (concession applies) and can be booked in advance here.

Throughout the exhibition there will be a number of talks, workshops and other ways to learn more about Munnings and his work.

  • Munnings Mural Workshop, 1 December (free): Be inspired by the exhibition and add to the museum’s mural in this family workshop. Learn about the life and career as well as help build up the mural based on his work. Sessions run from 10.30am-1pm and 2-4.30pm.
  • Alfred Munnings Talk, 14 December at 11.30am (free, booking recommended): Senior Researcher Curator Emma Mawdsley looks at the first exhibition of Alfred Munnings held at the Royal Academy, London, since 1919. She will discuss the history of the first 44 paintings displayed and how this exhibition was a turning point in his career
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The Muddy Choir

The Muddy Choir is a play about growing up and the humanizing power of music being performed on 10 November.

Focusing on three young soldiers serving up with the Durham Light Infantry in 1917, the story shows Will, Robbie and Jimbo being thrust into a landscape starkly different to the playing fields and estates of their Sunderland roots. Inspired by their childhood oath ‘nee killing, anly singing’, Robbie dreams that music will be their ticket away from the front. Unfortunately, attracting the attention of their commanding officers may prove more dangerous than bullets or gas.

The play was commissioned and produced by Theatre Centre and written by Jesse Briton to mark the centenary of WW1.

For more info and to book your tickets, visit the National Army Museum website here.

 

Image by Sarah London.

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Journey’s End Screening

Join the National Army Museum for a screening of ‘Journey’s End’, followed by a Q&A with the film’s producer, Guy de Beaujeu.

Guy de Beaujeu is an independent film producer who has successfully adapted for the screen two classics of First World War literature; Michael Morpurgo’s ‘Private Peaceful’ and R C Sherrif’s ‘Journey’s End’. During this evening, he will discuss the making of Journey’s End from his original decision to seek out the rights, through to his work during production with Combat Stress, the UK’s leading charity for veterans’ mental health.

Tickets cost £5 (concessions £4). To book, or for more information, visit the National Army’s Museums website here.

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Operation Torch

Join Emma Mawdsley, senior research curator, as she looks at the co-operation between the US and British troops during ‘Operation Torch’.

In 1942, the British and American’s launched a combined amphibious landing in North Africa with the code name ‘Torch’. Winston Churchill suggested that the British soldiers wore the uniforms of the Americans, believing that the Vichy French would be more welcoming to the Americans than the British soldiers.

Emma Mawdsley examines the photographs from the National Army Museum’s collection which illustrate the co-operation between the two nations during this major operation of the Second World War.

Tickets are free, however booking is recommended. Book your spot here.

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Lawrence of Arabia, the Arab revolt and the forgotten few who shaped it

Historian, Philip Walker, will be offering a complimentary talk which explores the Arab Revolt of 1916-18.

A key group of British officers based at Jeddah saved the Arab revolt from likely collapse both before and during T.E Lawrence’s indispensable involvement. In particular, the influence of Colonel Cyril Wilson over the revolt’s leader. Sherif Hussein of Mecca was at least important as that of Lawrence over Emir Feisal. Without the diplomatic and intelligence work of Wilson’s team, the world would not have heard of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’.

The forgotten men’s lost story provides a fresh and timely perspective and the Arab Revolut during its centenary.

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Operation Husky: 1943

In this complimentary talk, Will Fowler will discuss the amphibious and airborne assault in Italy in 1943. Operation Husky was one of the Second World War’s major campaigns in which the Allies captured the island of Sicily from the Axis powers. Learn more about the details of the initiative and its wider implications.

Booking is recommended – here.

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Bluebirds of War

On 6 July Dr Andrea McKenzie will discuss the experiences of the brave and dedicated Canadian nurses of the First World War.

In this complimentary talk, you will hear about the 3800+ nurses who tended to the wounded and ill soldiers of the First World War on all fronts, from Russia to Galliopoli, Salonika to France. Learn more about their role, particularly in 1918, the last year  of the war where they focused their efforts on the Western France on the front line and how through shot and shell, bombs and torpedoes, 3000 miles from their homes, these brave Canadian nurses cared for the casualties of war.

Although free, booking is recommended: click here.

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Be a Journalist at the National Army Museum

This is your chance to be a journalist for a day and have a go at making your own mini documentary about some the museums’ fascinating objects.

Discover some of the stories behind the objects, write your own script and record your film using the museum’s iPads.

This is the perfect half-term activity and is free. Daily sessions run from 10.30am – 4.30pm.

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Ice Maidens

Ice Maidens

Hear the extraordinary story of the first all-female team to cross Antarctica on muscle-power alone.

On 20 November 2017, the Ice Maidens – a team of women serving in the British Army or Army Reserve, set out on a 1000 mile expedition across Antarctica. They completed the task 62 days later.

At this event, listen to members of the Ice Maidens as they discuss what it was like to ski across Antarctica in temperature of -40 degrees, how they prepared for the task and why it was so significant.

Admission is free but booking is recommended.

Book here.

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Special Forces in the Shadows

Extreme training. Secret Missions. Total Dedication.

This fantastic exhibition presents the idea of security and secrecy through the lens of the Special Forces. Learn who they are, the skills they need and operations they’ve undertaken and understand the level of dedication needed from these incredible people.

Each of the five units play a unique role in British Security and this exhibition will open your eyes wider than ever before to this elite group and their military operations.

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